FRIENDS OF GRASSLANDS

Monthly Archives: November 2019

FREE COOKIES* while you SHOP Friday, December 6

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Join us
Friday, December 6
2:30 to 6:30 pm at Prairie Wind & Silver Sage
for CHRISTMAS SHOPPING!
We’ll have locally made gifts, hard to find field guides, Audubon birds and other stuffies, and free cookies*!

If you would like to arrange an alternate time or day, give Amy a call at 306-298-7695.

Donate to Prairie Wind & Silver Sage now and get a tax deductible receiptIf you can’t make it but would still like to contribute in some way, please consider donating at CanadaHelps.org. As a registered charity, donations to our work are eligible for a tax deductible receipt, and we welcome all contributions. 

*Our Board of Directors have many talents, among them being great cookie makers. These special cookies are while supplies last, and they won’t last long!

Christmas Shopping at Prairie Wind & Silver SAge in Val Marie, December 6

Wild Pigs in Sask: taking action before it’s too late – November 13

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In collaboration with our partner, Grasslands National Park, Prairie Wind & Silver Sage presents
WILD PIGS IN SASK: taking action before it’s too late
with DR. RYAN BROOK

Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 7 pm
@ Prairie Wind & Silver Sage

DR. RYAN BROOK, Principal Investigator with the Wildlife Ecology and Community Engagement research group from the University of Saskatchewan, will present his current research on wild boar across Canada:

Wild pigs are a highly invasive species that is now widespread across large areas of the prairie provinces, including much of the southern half of Saskatchewan. They currently occupy over 800,000km2 and are expanding at 80,000 km2/year. They are considered one of the worst invasive species on earth and are typically referred to as an ‘ecological train wreck’. They eat almost anything, including amphibians, plants, and may predate on white-tailed deer. Wild pigs can thrive in almost any habitat. They cause extensive damage to agricultural crops and have the potential to harbour a wide range of parasites and disease. My team has been studying wild pigs for ten years, using local knowledge, trail cameras, and GPS satellite collars. We have been tracking the spread of wild pigs and have some ideas on what might be done to stop the spread and move toward eradication.

Wild Pigs in Sask with Dr. Ryan Brook Nov 13, 2019 at PWSS